THEMATIC GROUPS

The OSG network includes several thematic subgroups which help to focus our activities.

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GLOBAL TRADE 

The Global Trade Programme provides expertise on the trade and use of orchids - this part of OSG has a stand-alone website. See: 

Orchid seed stained with tetrazolium. ©Jon Kendon.jpg

EX SITU

The aim of the Ex situ Conservation Group is to promote and exchange information about orchid seed storage, micropropagation and the cultivation of orchids in living collections.

More information soon!
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MORE TO BE ADDED

This part of the website is still under construction. We also have subgroups focusing in in situ activities and molecular techniques for species identification.

 

REGIONAL GROUPS I

The OSG network also includes several regional subgroups.

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ASIA

We are a network of individuals and organisations that work towards improving knowledge and raising awareness of the taxonomy, ecology and conservation of Asia’s native orchids. Our subgroup has a stand-alone website. See: 

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NORTH AMERICA

Members of the North American Regional Group are involved in all aspects of conservation from Red List assessment to education, from demographic studies and habitat management to fungal symbiosis studies leading to reintroduction.

Thelymitra speciosa (Queen of Sheba). ©K

MORE TO BE ADDED

This part of the website is still under construction. We also have subgroups for Africa and Madagascar, Australasia and the Indian Subcontinent.

 

REGIONAL GROUPS II

The OSG network also includes several regional subgroups.

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EUROPE

The European subgroup aims to raise awareness of native orchids and threats to their survival. 

Europe, although the second smallest continent, ranges from 25° to 75° N and 25° W to 35° E and encompasses many different vegetation types, ranging from alpine tundra to Mediterranean semi-deserts, and orchids occur in many of these habitats.

Apart from two species, all European orchids are terrestrial; Hammarbya paludosa and Liparis loeselii  might be seen as epiphytic growing on Sphagnum.

Major threats to European orchids include loss of habitat due to changing environmental conditions, urbanization etc., use of chemicals in agriculture resulting in the loss of pollinating insects, harvesting roots or tubers for food or horticulture.

Many European countries have orchid societies, some specializing in conservation of European orchids (see links).

Cattleya trianae, the National Flower of Colombia. ©Phil Seaton.JPG

MORE TO BE ADDED

This part of the website is still under construction. We also have subgroups for Africa and Madagascar, Australasia and the Indian Subcontinent.

Contact